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Two Tanker Incidents Confirm Tar Sand Supertanker Concerns in British Columbia

December 13, 2012
Two Tanker Incidents off BC Coast Confirm Tar Sand Supertanker Concerns

Two Tanker Incidents off BC Coast Confirm Tar Sand Supertanker Concerns

“How many close calls will we have then, and how will our coastal communities survive?” In the aftermath of two tanker incidents last month, Arnold Clifton, Chief Councillor of the Gitga’at First Nation, asks what the impacts may be from 225 oil supertankers in these waterways if the Northern Gateway Pipeline is not stopped.

In “Two Tanker Incidents off British Columbia Coast Confirm Tar Sand Supertanker Concerns,” Carol Linnitt of desmogblog connects the dots between tar sands extraction; some of the most pristine, dangerous waterways in North America, and First  Nations communities:

Two separate incidents involving container ships off the coast of British Columbia have local First Nations questioning the prudence of transporting tar sands crude in the region’s hazardous waterways. The incidents, occurring within less than 48 hours of each other, lend new support to those who oppose the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline that would bring over 200 oil-bearing supertankers through the area each year.

On Wednesday, November 21, the Hanjin Geneva, a 279-metre long cargo vessel, ran aground in the Prince Rupert Harbour after changing course to avoid a small fishing boat.

Yesterday the Tern Arrow, a deep-sea container ship, suffered a power failure in Gitga’at territorial waters in the Great Bear Rainforest.

“The ship lost power and drifted for three hours in Laredo Sound,” said Arnold Clifton, Chief Councillor of the Gitga’at First Nation. “This is the same place that a ship hit Wilson Rock in 1980. These are the same coastal waters that Enbridge is proposing to bring more than 225 oil supertankers through every year. How many close calls will we have then, and how will our coastal communities survive?”

Please read the full post here. And go to 350.org to learn about the February 17th march and rally against the XL Keystone Pipeline in Washington, D.C., organized by 350.org and Sierra Club. Please plan on attending!

But keep in mind, as we join forces ever more broadly against extreme fossil fuel extraction, that our movement is international. We must resist both the Northern Gateway and the Keystone XL, to protect climate, defend our beautiful and increasingly precious waterways, and stand up for indigenous people, farmers, and all communities impacted by tar sands extraction, not just in the U.S., but in Canada as well.

Desmog Yourself

Desmogblog‘s is one of the most important sites to watch for all things climate, including the fracking industry’s escalating attempt to pull wool over everyone’s eyes. A few of the other most interesting and relevant desmog posts lately include:

Shale Gas Bubble About to Burst, Say Energy Insiders Art Berman and Bill Powers.”

Why Climate Deniers Have No Scientific Credibility — In One Pie Chart

Millions in Gas Industry Cash Poured into Public Research in Australia.”

And… “Fossil-Fuel Funded Operatives Litter the Mainstream Media.”

The oil and gas industry has become a climate killer, and it sure loves to obscure that fact by spreading its money and its industry-funded “experts” around, even as it spews contaminants everywhere and tries to keep its toxic secrets. We need battalions of whistleblowers. Keep up the watchdog work, desmog!

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